CruxEX 3.0 64bit 2013 Linux Live CD

Crux logoCruxEX 3.0 64bit 2013 Linux LiveCD is based on CRUX 3.0 (latest version, released 130119), which is all Linux enthusiasts/nerds favorite OS. (CRUX 3.0 is a lightweight Linux distribution for the x86-64 architecture targeted at experienced Linux users). CruxEX 3.0 2013 uses the LXDE Desktop environment. I have replaced the original Crux kernel 3.6.11 with “my” special kernel 3.7.3-x86_64-exton, with support for “extra everything”.

NOTE
My first version of CruxEX 3.0 from 130126 contained Fluxbox instead of LXDE. I had some trouble to install LXDE in CRUX 3.0, but finally succeeded. LXDE is a little more “user friendly” than the Desktop environment Fluxbox. In today’s version (130128) I’ve also added more support for Broadcom wireless cards.

Kernel 3.7.3 is the second latest available stable kernel (as of 130126). Among all installed applications are Firefox 18.0.1, Gimp 2.8.2 and Wicd. Furthermore compilation tools so that you can install programs from source.

UNIQUE
CruxEX 3.0 64bit 2013 is – as my previous Crux-remasters EXTON-CR LXDE and EXTON-CR KDE – unique in the world. I.e. there is no other CRUX Live CD in any language (as far as I know). In any case, not for downloading.

KERNEL WITH SUPPORT FOR ALMOST EVERYTHING
If you have a new or/and unusual hardware you should try CruxEX. This is because the system (using kernel 3.7.3) supports “all forms of” hardware.

Read more…

A new 64bit kernel for Slackware – version 3.7.3

SlackwareI have compiled a very useful (as I think) 64bit kernel for Slackware 12.0 – 14.0. The kernel is compiled exactly the same way as Slackware’s latest kernel 3.2.29 huge. “My” kernel 3.7.3-exton has even more support for new hardware, etc. Kernel 3.7.3 is the second latest stable kernel available from Kernel.org. Kernel 3.7.4 was released today.

If you want to install my kernel in your Slackware 64bit system, do this:

1. Download  linux-kernel-3.7.3-x86_64-exton.txz
2. Install it with the command installpkg linux-kernel-3.7.3-x86_64-exton.txz
(The kernel is packed just like Slackware’s original kernels so that everything ends up in the right place)
3. If necessary, change your Grub configuration
4. If you have an Nvidia graphics card in your computer, you may need to look over your files in /etc/modprobe.d before restarting the computer. That is remove the “blacklisting” of Nouveau’s kernel module in the appropriate files blacklist.conf and nvidia-installer-disable-nouveau.conf. With “my” kernel functions the Nouveau “free” driver works just fine.

Restart your computer and enjoy!

Experiences with Fedora 18

FedoraThe eminent Linux system Fedora 18 (“Spherical Cow”) was released on 15 January 2013.

I have today (130119) tested to run Fedora 18 live. I also installed the system to hard disk. I installed from the ISO file Fedora-18-x86_64-Live Desktop.iso. As expected, everything worked perfectly.

During live execution Fedora used kernel 3.6.10 and Gnome 3.6.2 as Desktop Environment. After installing Fedora 18 to hard drive, I was offered more than 200 (!) updates, including kernel 3.7.2. A peculiar thing with Fedora 18 is that you can run the system live as root. Just login to Gnome as “Other” (i.e. as root) with no password. I.e.: There is no password for liveuser and root. Just login to Gnome as liveuser or root without a password.

Installation to HDD
Fedora uses a new version of the Anaconda installer. This version has put the focus on making installation as easy as possible for new users of Linux/Fedora. This means among other things that Anaconda suggest “auto” partition to make room for Fedora 18. Since I – before the installation of Fedora 18 – had ten (10) other Linux systems plus a windows system installed on the current computer, I had prepared a special partition for Fedora before the installation started. I wanted to install fedora on a partition on an external USB hard drive, which during the installation became known as /dev/sda (!). My first internal hard drive became known as /dev/sdf and my second hard drive as /dev/sdg. I therefore had to be really careful not to install on the wrong partition. Fedora 18 uses the “new” Grub (Grub 2). However, I have already installed the “old” Grub (Grub Legacy) on /dev/sdb3 (my second hard disk) and in /dev/sda (MBR). This Grub Legacy installation I wanted to keep. To avoid the MBR on /dev/sda (my first hard drive) to be was overwritten by Fedora/Anaconda, I chose to install Grub 2 on the install partition /dev/sda3 (my external USB drive). It succeeded. See HERE how my menu.lst (/boot/grub/menu.lst) with twelve (12) installed OS’s looks. After the hard drive installation the disk names returned to “normal”. I.e. /dev/sda (the first internal hard drive), /dev/sdb (the second internal hard disk) and /dev/sdc (my external USB hard drive).

Actions after my installation of Fedora 18 to hard drive
After upgrading the system and restarting the computer with the new kernel 3.7.2, I chose to install the Desktop Environment Cinnamon 1.6.7 and use it as the Default environment. Cinnamon, is like a cross between Classic Gnome and KDE. Without KDE’s “awkwardness” such as Akonadi and Soprano etc. At least I think so.

A possible exton remaster of Fedora 18
I have previously made several remasters of Fedora. Fedora 14 I called EXTON RHF 14. Maybe a live version/remaster of Fedora 18 with the Cinnamon Desktop Environment would be interesting. As far as I know there is still no such remaster around.

See a screenshot of Fedora 18 when I run Cinnamon.

Summary
Fedora 18 is a prime Linux system that deserves much more attention. No bugs or other unpleasantness (discovered by me). Everything seems carefully calculated and tested.

Yet another 32bit kernel for Slackware – version 3.7.2 (latest stable kernel)

SleckEXToday I have compiled a very useful (as I think) kernel for Slackware 10.0 – 14.0. The kernel is compiled exactly the same way as Slackware’s latest kernel 3.2.29 huge. “My” kernel 3.7.2-exton has even more support for new hardware, etc. Kernel 3.7.2 (released 130111) is the latest stable kernel available from Kernel.org.

If you want to install my kernel in your Slackware system, do this:

1. Download  linux-kernel-3.7.2-i486-exton.txz
2. Install it with the command installpkg linux-kernel-3.7.2-i486-exton.txz
(The kernel is packed just like Slackware’s original kernels so that everything ends up in the right place)
3. If necessary, change your Grub configuration
4. If you have an Nvidia graphics card in your computer, you may need to look over your files in /etc/modprobe.d before restarting the computer. That is remove the “blacklisting” of Nouveau’s kernel module in the appropriate files blacklist.conf and nvidia-installer-disable-nouveau.conf. With “my” kernel functions the Nouveau “free” driver works just fine.

I plan to use this kernel in new versions of Exton-Slack, SlackEX and Exton|Defender based on Slackware 14.0.

Restart your computer and enjoy!

“My” Ubuntu/Debian kernel 3.8.0-0-exton (3.8-rc3)

Today (130111) I have compiled yet another Ubuntu kernel for 64bit systems. This time kernel 3.8.0-0-exton, equivalent to Kernel.org’s latest kernel 3.8-rc3, released yesterday (130110).

Install kernel 3.8.0-0-exton in Ubuntu/Debian based distributions

My self-compiled Ubuntu kernels can be used in all types of Ubuntu systems, incl.  Mint. They can even be used in Debian Wheezy (upcoming Debian 7) and Debian Squeeze (Debian 6). If you want to use my kernel 3.8.0-0-exton for 64bit systems, you can download it from HERE. Install as described on my international blog below. (Change the filenames of course). Advantages of the newer kernel: Many, if you have newer hardware, etc. I myself seem to notice that the system runs faster, both from the disc and from the hard drive. This is noticeable especially during startup and shutdown. (In any case, on my computers).

DebEX Barebone Linux 64bit Linux Live CD

DebianThe system is a based on Debian Wheezy (upcoming Debian 7). Fluxbox 1.3.2 is used as Desktop environment. Fluxbox is very light on resources and easy to handle but yet full of features to make an easy, and extremely fast, desktop experience. I have replaced the original Debian kernel 3.2 with “my” special kernel 3.7.0-7-exton (Kernel.org’s 3.7, stable). The system language is English.

Why has the kernel been replaced?

There has been added a lot of different kinds of hardware support etc. in kernel 3.7. So if you have acquired new hardware, which is not supported in your Linux systems based on Debian/Ubuntu it might be worth testing DebEX Barebone. There is, among other things, support for brand new USB devices, like printers and cameras, etc. If you just want to switch to a newer Debian/Ubuntu kernel, you can read HERE – 64bit or HERE – 32bit.

Program content etc
As the name suggests, DebEX Barebone has only a minimum of software installed in advance. Among them LXTerminal, PCManFM, Leafpad, Wicd, Iceweasel (Firefox) and Synaptic. All programs have been updated to the latest available version as of January 10, 2013. See a complete LIST of all installed packages. I will give you the pleasure of installing all extra packages YOU need after a hard disk installation of DebEX Barebone.

Read more in English or Swedish.